William Lahneman

Professor of Homeland Security and Chair of the Department of Security Studies and International Affairs
Security Studies and International Affairs Dept
Daytona College of Arts & Sciences
Daytona Beach campus

Dr. William J. Lahneman is  Professor of Homeland Security and Chair of the Security Studies and International Affairs Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida. He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), an M.A. in National Security Affairs from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a B.S. from the United States Naval Academy. Lahneman has held academic positions as Associate Chair of the Political Science Department at the U.S. Naval Academy and as Associate Director for Programs at the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy, where he conducted several open source research projects for different parts of the US intelligence community.

Lahneman is on the editorial advisory boards of the International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence and the International Journal of Intelligence, Security, and International Affairs, a Spanish security journal. A former career naval officer, Commander Lahneman, U.S. Navy (retired) was a Surface Warfare Officer with specializations in Strategic Planning, International Negotiations, and Nuclear Propulsion. Lahneman’s research interests include homeland security, the future of intelligence analysis, military intervention and nation building, and international relations theory. He received a Smith Richardson Foundation International Security and Foreign Policy Junior Faculty Research Grant for his book project Keeping U.S. Intelligence Effective: The Need for a Revolution in Intelligence Affairs (2011) and was awarded a U.S. Fulbright Senior Scholar grant to conduct research and teach in Madrid, Spain from January to May of 2019. His principal publications are listed at https://works.bepress.com/william_lahneman/.


  • Ph.D. - Doctor of Philosophy in International Relations, Johns Hopkins University
  • M.B.A. - Master of Business Administration in Management, Golden Gate University
  • M.A. - Master of Arts in National Security Affairs, Naval Postgraduate School
  • B.S. - Bachelor of Science in Management, United States Naval Academy

  • SS 115: Intro to International Rel

Forthcoming 2020, (Ed., with Joseph R. Rudolph). Combating Terrorism in the 21st Century: American Laws, Strategies, and Agencies. (Santa Barbara, Ca.: ABC-CLIO).

(2019) (Ed., with Rubén Arcos). The Art of Intelligence: More Simulations, Exercises, and Games. (Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield).

(2017) (with Rubén Arcos). “Experiencing the Art of Intelligence: Using Simulations/gaming for Teaching Intelligence and Developing Analysis and Production Skills,” Intelligence and National Security 32, no.7: 972-985.

(2016) “IC Data Mining in the Post-Snowden Era,” International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 29, 4 (Winter 2016-2017): 700-723.

(2015) “Revolution in Intelligence Affairs” in Gregory Moore, ed., The Encyclopedia of U.S. Intelligence (New York: Taylor and Francis Group).


(2014) (Ed., with Rubén Arcos). The Art of Intelligence: Simulations, Exercises, and Games. (Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield).


(2013). “Examining the NGPI Dots,” International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 26, no. 4 (Fall 2013): 730-743.

(2013) (Ed., with Joseph Rudolph). From Mediation to Nation Building: Third Parties and the Management of Communal Conflicts (Lanham, MD: Lexington Press).

(2012) “Homeland Security Intelligence” in Keith Gregory Logan and James D. Ramsey, eds., Introduction to Homeland Security (Boulder, CO: Westview Press).

(2011) William J. Lahneman and Hugo Keesing. “Estimating Iraqi WMDs: A Simulation,” Simulation and Gaming 42, no.6 (December 2011): 803-821.

(2011) Keeping U.S. Intelligence Effective: The Need for a Revolution in Intelligence Affairs (Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press).  

(2010) “The Need for a New Intelligence Paradigm,” International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 23, no. 2 (Summer 2010): 201-225.

(2009) William J. Lahneman and Hugo Keesing. “Estimating Iraqi WMDs: A Simulation,” Simulation and Gaming (OnlineFirst edition).

(2007) “U.S. Intelligence Prior to 9/11 and Obstacles to Reform,” in Thomas C. Bruneau & Steven C. Boraz, eds., Reforming Intelligence: Obstacles to Democratic Reform and Effectiveness (Austin, TX: University of Texas Press).

(2007) “Is A Revolution in Intelligence Affairs Occurring,” International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 20, no. 1 (Spring 2007): 1-18.

(2006) “Ready or Not? Perspectives on Preparedness Five Years After 9/11,” Washington Post, 10 September 2006, B08.

(2005) “Knowledge Sharing in the Intelligence Community After 9/11,” International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 17, no. 4 (Winter 2004-2005): 614-633.

(2004) (Ed.) Military Intervention: Cases in Context for the Twenty-First Century (Boulder, CO: Rowman and Littlefield).  

(2004) “Outsourcing the IC’s Stovepipes?” International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 16, no. 4 (Winter 2003-2004): 573-593.

(2003) “Changing Power Cycles and Foreign Policy Role-Power Realignments: Asia, Europe, and North America,” International Political Science Review 23, no. 1 (January 2003): 97-111.

(1990) “Interdicting Drugs in the Big Pond,” US Naval Institute Proceedings 116 (July 1990): 56-63.

(1990) “Portrait of a Modern Drug Smuggler,” US Naval Institute Proceedings 116 (July 1990): 60-61.


In addition to his academic duties, Dr. Lahneman has lectured and conducted simulations dealing with intelligence analysis, intelligence education, and the future of the U.S. intelligence enterprise at a number of organizations, including several U.S. intelligence agencies; the U.S. State and Treasury Departments; Spanish, Romanian, Turkish, and Ghanaian intelligence organizations; and the International Spy Museum and Smithsonian Institution. He has consulted for the U.S. government, the Federation of Electric Power Companies of Japan (FEPC), and the World Bank. During his naval career, Lahneman served in four warships: the nuclear-powered cruisers USS TEXAS (CGN-39) and USS TRUXTUN (CGN-35); the guided missile frigate USS SAMUEL ELIOT MORISON (FFG-13), and the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN-71). He also served on the staffs of the Commander Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMNAVSURFPAC) and the Commander Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMNAVAIRPAC).